A Whisbear Giveaway!

A Whisbear Giveaway!

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Revisiting the Pink Noise conversation from Instagram a couple weeks ago:

We reached out to @whisbear_usa to answer the questions many had about pink and white noise. Turns out, they just put a general term “white noise” on the website to keep things simple, although there is a big difference between the two.

Read on and bookmark!

WHAT IS PINK NOISE AND WHY IS IT SO EFFECTIVE?

There are many types of noise, with names assigned after... colors: White noise, pink, brown, red, purple... Each of them is characterized by a different noise power on different bandwidths. Most of us know about the white noise, a name that is commonly used to describe almost all types of noise.

Although white noise might be helpful in a lot of situations, it turns out that pink noise can be even better. It is similar to white noise - a mix of different sounds of varied frequencies that the human ear is capable of hearing. The difference is that in pink noise the power decreases with the frequency, which means that high tones are more difficult to hear, which makes the noise more “pleasant” to listen to, especially for babies. Pink noise is also good at masking other sounds and has all the positive qualities discussed above without stimulating cortisol production.

INFANTS DON’T LIKE SILENCE

The discussion about noise for babies should begin with an explanation of what happens in the mother’s womb. In short - it’s not a quiet place. Blood rushes through the umbilical cord, the mother’s heart rhythmically beats, bowel movements. Actually, the noise is louder than a turned on vacuum cleaner! Quite a party! However, baby ears are protected with fluid, vernix and thick tympanic membrane. After birth children don’t hear all the sounds either. At the time their hearing threshold is about 40dB (so they might not react to our whispers, which are about 30 dB). In the first year of life hearing develops quickly and children are able to hear “quieter” sounds. Logically, quiet environment might be quite stressful for a new born baby.

HOW TO SAFELY USE NOISE-PRODUCING DEVICES.

The volume level should not exceed 50 dB, which is equivalent to the sound of falling rain or shower.  The source of noise should not be placed directly at the baby’s ear but at least a couple of dozen centimetres away.

INTERESTING STUDY FACTS FROM WHITE NOISE AND INFANT SLEEP

Some interesting facts have arisen which show that in some studies babies can fall asleep almost 80% faster with white/pink noise present compared to babies without. Also, while using the white/pink noise will certainly help your baby to be calm, it will also help you to sleep more restfully, so you get double the benefit!

YOUR CHANCE TO WIN YOUR OWN WHISBEAR THIS WEEK

We have loved learning and sharing about Whisbear with all of you, and starting today and for the next week we are running a giveaway together with Whisbear. Simply visit the entry page below and enter to win your own Whisbear. You can earn extra entries by following us on Instagram @livingnotes and also Whisbear's US account @Whisbear_USA. Thank you to all of you and good luck!




 

 

 

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